Making Room To Grow

“The road to freedom is a beautiful system.”  – Phil Jackson.

Every game has it’s rules.  Boy Basketball Large A

– Put the ball in the basket.

– You have to dribble or pass, you can’t carry it.

– And, you have to do it between these lines.

Within that space we’re invited to play with what’s possible.

Setting rules and boundaries is tricky business. Too big, too loose and the structure disappears . There’s activity but no game. Too small, too rigid and creativity is lost. There’s nothing to explore, no room to expand, no place to play.

Once the athlete knows the rules we create structure to explore that space; an offensive system to try to score and a defense to stop our opponent. You find creative ways to accomplish your goal, to meet the challenge. Your opponent responds and you adjust with something new finding more and more possibilities within the space  – between the lines.

You put structure to your training, setting limits on what you will and won’t do, over time creating a system to help you develop your potential, finding a balance that helps you focus in and open up at the same time. One that keeps you safe and challenges you to go further.  In a wonderful paradox the structure sets you free.

Dr. Lenna Liu captures it beautifully in her blog post on children, nutrition and health at On Being. ” As a yogi and an acrobat we practice the paradox of holding strength and softness at the same time. When we have structure we also have the capacity to expand and flow.” 

What structure do you want to create in order to make room to discover your potential – to play your game?

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Creating A Margin

Tired AthleteThe young athlete is tired. The last five days have been a constant stream of activity. School, work, speech tournaments, more work, more speech, more school, tonight training. So we back off. His engine, as we say , is running hot.

The young athlete is stressed. There is club soccer, training to get ready for college, the final semester of senior year with grades, projects, finals and AP testing. On top of that a job and the decision about whether or not to play a spring sport at the high school. Talented, gifted, accomplished and running hot.

Over time, like most athletes, they’ll learn the wisdom of nature; that energy cannot be endlessly spent with out being renewed and that a living system under stress cannot heal itself.

In physiology we talk about the General Adaptive Syndrome or Super-compensation but it all comes back to the simple fact that growth happens in the spaces between our efforts, in the margins. Progress requires effort but, we forget that margin is a non-negotiable as well.

In the spiritual life the practice of Sabbath is essential to health and holiness. Honoring the Sabbath isn’t a suggestion it’s  a commandment. And so it is for the athlete.

Thoreau saw the value of margin, “I love a broad margin to my life. Sometimes, in a summer morning, having taken my accustomed bath, I sat in my sunny doorway from sunrise till noon, rapt in a revery, amidst the pines and hickories and sumachs, in undisturbed solitude and stillness. I grew in those seasons like corn in the night, and they were far better than any work of the hands would have been. They were not time subtracted from my life, but so much over and above my usual allowance.”

Effort has its place and its obvious rewards while rest can feel like a sign of weakness. But, there is a rhythm to all things like a beating heart emptying its chambers and then filling again. Grace flows in both directions. Give your best effort then,  enjoy a little life in the margins.