Love and Joy

The athlete’s journey begins with play. That play manifests itself in the experience of joy and enthusiasm. And, if its encouraged, into a love of the activity. When three thousand Olympic Athletes were asked the primary factor in starting their sport, the number one response was love of activity. We love to play.

” We play because we have an exuberance of spirits and energy…, says Kay Redfield Jamison in her book Exuberance, The Passion For Life … but, we are also exuberant because we play.”

There is something in those movements of gliding and sliding, twisting and turning, running and jumping and rolling over and over that gives us a sense of freedom and delight. That is is the grace of motion:  playful, elegant and transforming.

So in this season of love and joy one of the best ways to experience those is to take time to play, especially if you have snow! As Redfield Jamison writes, ” It is a rare person who remains unmoved by a first snowfall. Snow is magic; it draws us in, jostles memory and stirs desire. It enchants.”   Here’s what enchantment looks like. Merry Christmas!!

Learning to Wait

DSCF1928I’ve been thinking about waiting during this season of Advent. There is a beautiful rhythm to the seasons; times of growth and action, times of dormancy and preparation. Their nature is cyclical and spiraling not linear. Very few straight lines. Everything unfolding in its own time.

So it is for the athlete as well. We train and practice, we do the work and we wait. We wait for the change, the growth , the adaptation that we’re seeking, the body’s response. We wait for our time, the moment, our opportunity to contribute.  And, it doesn’t come  – not all at once or right away  – until it does. Then we step on the track and our time drops. We make the catch or the throw or the move. What we need, what we’ve been working on is miraculously there.

Athletics, like a spiritual practice, teaches us about waiting.  In her book To Dance With God, Gertrude Mueller Nelson writes, “We equate waiting with wasting time …. But waiting is unpractical time, good for nothing but mysteriously necessary to all that is becoming. As in a pregnancy, nothing of value comes into being without a period of quiet incubation: not a healthy baby, not a loving relationship, not a reconciliation, a new understanding, a work of art, never a transformation..”

The athlete learns to wait gracefully, to resist the temptation to force the action, to rush, to press – instead to let the game come to us.

We learn to pay attention, get in position, do the work and then trust the process, so that when the time is right and the waiting is over, we’re ready. We discover that the grace that’s revealed in the beautiful, flowing action of our movements; the generous quality of our character; or the gift of transformation was at work and growing all along in the waiting.  Enjoy the season.

Lean In The Direction You Want To Go

iStock_000011469617MediumIts hard to move gracefully when you’re going in two directions at once. Hips moving one way, shoulders another it’s hard to keep rhythm or balance. Oops, down he goes! In any sport we learn to lean into the change even if it’s ever so slightly so that we can make the change gracefully, shifting momentum and exerting power in a new direction.

I’m learning I do well to remember that in the rest of my life. Whether its an unexpected change to avoid an obstacle or an intentional step in a new direction it seems to be better to lean in the direction I want to go. Grace flows more readily when I  can relax, and commit to the change. Lean in.